How It Works (FAQs)

Frequently Asked Questions

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Many of them infect animals, but some coronaviruses from animals can change into a new human
coronavirus that can spread from person-to-person. This is what happened with the new coronavirus known as SARS-CoV-2, which causes the disease known as COVID-19.

Like other respiratory illnesses, human coronaviruses most commonly spread to others from an infected person through:

  • Droplets produced through coughing, sneezing, and talking
  • Close personal contact, such as caring for an infected person
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands

Some people get COVID-19 without ever showing symptoms but they can still spread the infection to others.

Our clinical staff will walk you through the next steps. Depending on your symptoms, you might be advised to go to the emergency room or self-quarantine at home. We will check in with you daily to monitor your progress.

We are closely aligning ourselves with the guidelines set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local public health departments. All patients who have a cold, flu, cough or similar symptoms must wear masks inside the clinic. Our staff are wearing the proper protective equipment and are thoroughly sanitizing rooms as per protocol.

Based on current evidence, it is unclear whether the presence of SARS-CoV2 virus (COVID) antibodies results in immunity. Decisions about ongoing monitoring or return to normal activities should be made after discussing with your clinician.

A negative serologic test result indicates that you have not developed detectable antibodies at the time of testing. This may be due to having testing performed too early in the course of COVID-19, the absence of exposure to the virus, or the lack of an adequate immune response. A negative test does not completely rule out a past or present infection with SARS-CoV-2 virus and correlation with a diagnostic test may be considered to look for an active infection. A negative result should not be used to influence social distancing, hand hygiene, or use of protective equipment decisions.

A positive serologic test result indicates that you have likely produced an immune response to the SARS-CoV2 virus (COVID) or one of a subset of the other types of coronaviruses (HKU1, NL63, OC43 or 229E). A positive test result does not exclude an active infection and it is not known if the antibody confers clinical immunity. It is very important to keep in mind that this test does not indicate whether you currently have an active infection or whether you are infectious. A PCR test may be recommended to help identify an active infection. Keep in mind that patients can remain infectious for many weeks after they are infected with the virus. A positive test means you may or may not pass the infection along to others. Based on current evidence, it is unclear whether the presence of these antibodies result in immunity. Decisions about ongoing monitoring or return to normal activities should be made after discussing with your clinician.

Since the serology test is relevant to potential infections that have occurred 4 or more days after your illness, repeat testing is unnecessary unless you develop a new potential infection. These tests are most accurate when you test negative though suggesting that you have not had exposure to coronavirus.

Available Tests

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